Women in Wartime

An Image of Courage

Women-headFrom serving as nurses in the Revolutionary War, to being full-on Soldiers in Afghanistan today, women have played a huge role throughout American military history. Here are some interesting statistics from their 238 years of service.

2: Notable women who fought after their husbands fell in battle during the Revolutionary War: Molly Pitcher and Margret Corbin.

1: Female Medal of Honor recipients (Dr. Mary Walker).

73: The number of deaths (out of 1,333 admissions!) at the Confederate hospital ran by Sally Tompkins, the lowest death rate of any in the south. She was the only woman to be named an officer (captain) in the Confederate Army.

35,000: Number of American women who served in non-combat roles during World War I.

22,000: Number of the women who served in WWI who did so as nurses, either in Europe or stateside.

400,000: Total number of women who served in non-combat military roles during WWII.

Women-160 million: Distance in miles flown by Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASPs) in non-combat missions during WWII.

639: Number of medals awarded to members of the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps during WWII. They include the Distinguished Service Medal, Legion of Merit, Soldier’s Medal, Bronze Star, Air Medal, and the Purple Heart.

2%: The maximum percentage of women allowed in the military under the Women’s Armed Services Integration Act of 1948.

Women-220%: The percentage of the Women's Army Corps that served overseas during the Korean War.

11,000: Approximate number of females who served in the Vietnam War.

90%: Percentage of women serving in Vietnam who were nurses.

100%: Percentage women who served in Vietnam who volunteered to do so.

Nearly 1,000/more than 160: Number of women wounded and killed in Iraq and Afghanistan since 2003.

2013: The year Pentagon policy began to allow women to serve in official combat roles. 

20%: Approximate percentage of new military recruits who are female as of 2013, the highest percentage ever.

All of these numbers add up to an impressive record of service, and prove that patriotism knows no gender.

For more inspiring images, be sure to check out our “Women Warriors” Pinterest board

Mark Dye

About the author: Mark Dye

Mark Dye has been writing articles, recording podcasts, and putting together books on personal finance for nearly a decade. His work has been recognized by the American Bankers Association and the Institute for Financial Literacy, and received an 2011 APEX Grand Award for Writing. Follow Mark on Google+.

Contact: Mark Dye


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